JUSTICE FOR ALL

 

JUSTICE CHRISTIANUS

Fifth Day of Lent

When Jesus became aware of the treachery of the Pharisees, He departed. Many crowds followed Him, and He cured all of them,  and He ordered them not to make Him known. This was to fulfill what had been spoken through the prophet Isaiah: “Here is my servant, whom I have chosen, my beloved, with whom my soul is well pleased. I will put my Spirit upon him, and he will proclaim justice to the Gentiles. He will not wrangle or cry aloud, nor will anyone hear his voice in the streets. He will not break a bruised reed or quench a smoldering wick until he brings justice to victory.  And in his name the Gentiles will hope.”  – Matthew 12:15-21

To proclaim justice to the Gentiles, those others than merely ourselves, and to bring justice to victory, such was the mission of Christ in the understanding of “Justice Christianus”.  But this victorious justice is accomplished by a quality of spirit that seeks to heal all of the people and do so without bruising a reed of grass or dowsing a smoldering wick of a candle.  Justice not done with malice and vengeance but rather patiently in due process.

I cannot bring to mind an occasion when vengeance or vindictiveness was evident in Christ.   He did protest in the Temple and He did curse a fig tree, probably as an object lesson for His disciples.  But He did advocate a turning of the other cheek in an act of patient resolve.  He did advocate making settlement rather than risk the severity of the courts.  But vengeance performed by mortal souls?  No.  Vindictiveness brooding in a mortal soul?  No.

Does this mean that we give a free rein to injustice or surrender to a fate of never challenged injustice?  No.  We confront injustice; we challenge injustice; we endure injustice until the power of patience gains its ultimate victory; we appeal to conscience and the Lord’s commands.

Loved Ones, history is a legacy of justice trying to gain victory over injustice.  An aspect of our fallen nature is this legacy of injustice; however, an aspect of the Divine image placed within us is the power of conscience inspired.  Injustice is still with us but in the midst of it are souls who like Christ call for Justice not only for ourselves but for all others as well.

Always in Christ’s Service,

Fr. Charitas de la Cruz

About Father Charitas de la Cruz

a Jesuit missionary into realms of dreams and possibilities: a pastor, a counselor, a poet, a photographer, a contemplative Christian, servant of Christ, pen name of Rev. Dr. Jim McWhinnie
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